ABOUT

About the PEER STEM series webcasts:
PEER collaborates with
KAMU-TV to bring live STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) educational webcasts to K-12 students nationwide. Webcasts feature professors, scientists, veterinary students, technicians, and clinicians who discuss veterinary medical and STEM-related topics aligned with Texas state science standards. Topics range from human and animal health to college preparation and enable K-12 students to make relevant connections between science and real-world careers.

KAMU-TV films each presentation in high definition and they are archived on the PEER YouTube channel for future viewing.

About PEER:
PEER provides multifaceted outreach for science and veterinary medical education. Middle and high school curricula, state and nation-wide video conferencing and webcasts, and presentations to K-12 students stimulate career interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). 

Funding for PEER is composed of three grants: GK-12 Fellows Integrate Science/Math in Rural Middle Schools, Integrating Environmental Health Science in Rural Schools, and Science Promotion in Rural Middle Schools, a Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA).

Major funding for PEER is provided by John Deere, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (ORIP) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

For more information, visit the PEER website at peer.tamu.edu.


Pharmacology: The Search
Pharmacology: The Search
for the Magic Pill
 - CLICK TO REGISTER
Wed., Nov. 8 at 10:00 am CST
Appropriate for grades 7 through 12

About the webcast: We take medicine for everything from minor aches and pains to cancer treatment, but few of us understand how they work. Join Dr. Carly Patterson, clinical assistant professor at the CVM, as she explains the role of a pharmacologist in developing the drugs that so impact our health, and the science of drug action on biological systems.

TEKS:

  • 7.12(B): Identify the main functions of the systems of the human organism, including the nervous, and endocrine systems.
  • 7.13(B): Describe and relate responses in organisms that may result from internal stimuli such as wilting in plants and fever or vomiting in animals that allow them to maintain balance
  • 7.14(A): Define heredity as the passage of genetic instructions from one generation to the next generation.
  • 7.14(B): Compare the results of uniform or diverse offspring from sexual reproduction or asexual reproduction.
  • Biology 4(B): Investigate and explain cellular processes, including homeostasis, energy conversions, transport of molecules, and synthesis of new molecules.
  • Biology 9(A): Compare the structures and functions of different types of biomolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.
  • Biology 9(B): Compare the reactants and products of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of energy and matter.
  • Biology 9(C): Identify and investigate the role of enzymes.
  • Biology 10(A): Describe the interactions that occur among systems that perform the functions of regulation, nutrient absorption, reproduction, and defense from injury or illness in animals.
  • Biology 11(A): Describe the role of internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis.
Biology 11(C): Summarize the role of microorganisms in both maintaining and disrupting the health of both organisms and ecosystems. 


What Would You Do? – Case Studies in Science and Ethics
Thu., Nov. 16 at 10:00 am CST
Appropriate for grades 10 through 12

About the webcast: Join Dr. Barbara Gastel, professor of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences at the CVM and of Humanities in Medicine at Texas A&M Health Science Center’s College of Medicine, as she discusses the ethical implications of scientific research and communication. Students will take on the role of scientists as Dr. Gastel presents real-world scenarios, with difficult ethical choices, from high school, college, and the professional career field in which they must not only avoid the “wrong” choice, but also make the “right” choices. 

TEKS:

  • Middle School—2(C): Analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends.
  • High School—4: Students should be able to distinguish between scientific decision-making methods and ethical and social decisions that involve the application of scientific information.
  • High School—2(I): Communicate valid conclusions supported by the data.
  • High School—3(B): Communicate and apply scientific information extracted from various sources.
High School—3(D): Evaluate the impact of research on scientific thought, society, and the environment.

Anatomy and Physiology - CLICK HERE TO REGISTER  


Wed., Nov. 29 10:00 am CST
Appropriate for grades 7 through 12

About the webcast: Join Dr. Larry Johnson, professor of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences at the CVM, as he takes you on a tour of the body’s systems! This presentation will provide an overview of anatomy and physiology.  The different types of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems and their structures and functions in the human body and other living organisms will be discussed. Additionally, Dr. Johnson will define anatomy and physiology, describe the fields of anatomy, and the integumentary, musculoskeletal, lymphatic, and immune systems. Veterinary anatomy specimens will be used.

TEKS:

  • 7.12(A): Investigate and explain how internal structures of organisms have adaptations that allow specific functions such as gills in fish, hollow bones in birds, or xylem in plants.
  • 7.12(B): Identify the main functions of the systems of the human organism, including the circulatory, respiratory, skeletal, muscular, digestive, excretory, reproductive, integumentary, nervous, and endocrine systems.
  • 7.12(C): Recognize levels of organization in plants and animals, including cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms.
  • Biology 5(B): Examine specialized cells, including roots, stems, and leaves of plants; and animal cells such as blood, muscle, and epithelium.
  • Biology 5(D): Recognize that disruptions of the cell cycle lead to diseases such as cancer.
  • Biology 7(A): Analyze and evaluate how evidence of common ancestry among groups is provided by the fossil record, biogeography, and homologies, including anatomical, molecular, and developmental.
  • Biology 10(A): Describe the interactions that occur among systems that perform the functions of regulation, nutrient absorption, reproduction, and defense from injury or illness in animals.
  • Biology 10(C): Analyze the levels of organization in biological systems and relate the levels to each other and to the whole system.
Also, applicable for the following courses: Anatomy and Physiology, Animal Science, and Veterinary Medical Applications.

Proteins: Structure & Evolution
Wed., Dec. 6 at 10:00 am CST
Appropriate for grades 10 through 12

About the webcast: Join Dr. Lawrence Dangott from the CVM as he describes the structure of proteins and how they have changed over time. This presentation will provide an overview of protein structure and function within DNA. Dr. Dangott will also define molecular evolution and its relationship to changes in the properties of molecules. 

TEKS:

  • Biology 5(C): Describe the roles of DNA, ribonucleic acid (RNA), and environmental factors in cell differentiation.
  • Biology 5(D): Recognize that disruptions of the cell cycle lead to diseases such as cancer.
  • Biology 6(A): Identify components of DNA, and describe how information for specifying the traits of an organism is carried in the DNA.
  • Biology 6(B): Recognize that components that make up the genetic code are common to all organisms.
  • Biology 6(C): Explain the purpose and process of transcription and translation using models of DNA and RNA.
  • Biology 6(E): Identify and illustrate changes in DNA and evaluate the significance of these changes.
  • Biology 6(H): Describe how techniques such as DNA fingerprinting, genetic modifications, and chromosomal analysis are used to study the genomes of organisms.
  • Biology 7(F) Analyze and evaluate the effects of other evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation, and recombination.
  • Biology 7(G): Analyze and evaluate scientific explanations concerning the complexity of the cell.
  • Biology 9(A): Compare the structures and functions of different types of biomolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.
Biology 9(D): Analyze and evaluate the evidence regarding formation of simple organic molecules and their organization into long complex molecules having information such as the DNA molecule for self-replicating life.